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05年01月自考英语阅读一试题

2005-12-27 14:53  

  全国2005年4月高等教育自学考试

  英语阅读(一)试题

  课程代码:00595

  PART ONE  (70 POINTS)

  Ⅰ.TEXT COMPREHENSION

  The following comprehension questions are based on the texts you have learned, and each of them is provided with 4 choices marked A,B,C and D. Choose the best answer to each question and write the corresponding letter on the ANSWER SHEET.

  (20 points,1 point each)

  1."With that chain on his watch, Jim might loot at the time in any company."The underlined part in this sentence from Gifts of the Magi means ____.

  A. in the presence of any person

  B. while working in a firm

  C. when interviewed by a corporation

  D. doing any business

  2.According to The Wife of Bath's Tale, what women want most is ____.

  A. jewels and money                      B. happiness

  C. fine clothes                           D. leadership in the family

  3.In The Fisherman and His Wife, the Fisherman was ____ when his wife wished for one thing after another.

  A. tolerant but not pleased              B. bewildered but not mad

  C. anguished but not rebellious          D. furious but not daring

  4.In Little Match Girl, when her little hands were almost benumbed with cold, the little match girl ____.

  A. thought of the kindness of her grandmother

  B. thought of the pleasant smell of the roast goose

  C. went home but received a beating from her father

  D. rubbed the match against the wall and warmed her hands

  5.The title of the story A Day's Wait most probably means that the boy ____.

  A. had been waiting all day to die

  B. had waited a whole  day for his father to come back

  C. had been waiting all day to recover from his illness

  D. had waited a whole day before the drugs took effect

  6.According to Bringing up Children,"upbringing" and "education" are ____.

  A. merely two different terms for the same process

  B. the same term for the different processes

  C. two utterly different but closely related processes because children are involved in different environments

  D. interdependent because both parents and teachers are responsible for the opportunities provided for children's development

  7.The National Gallery in London overlooks ____.

  A. Parliament

  B. Trafalgar Square

  C. the National Gallery of British Art

  D. the National Portrait Gallery

  8.According to How to Live like a Millionaire, most millionaires measure success by ____.

  A. income                                B. consumption

  C. investment                             D.net worth

  9.Based on the passage United Nations, which of the following statements is NOT true?____.

  A. The U.N. has the right to intervene in the member states' internal affairs.

  B. All the member states, big or small, have the same rights and obligations.

  C. The day that United Nations came into existence is United Nations Day.

  D. Armed forces should not be used except in protecting the common interest.

  10.According to Universities and Polytechnics, London University is similar to Oxford and Cambridge in that ____.

  A. they all consist of many constituent colleges

  B. they were all founded in the 13th century

  C. students all live outside the campus

  D. they set up a different pattern of university life

  11."Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, will sink into a Dark Age."This quotation comes from the famous speech of ____ during the Second World War.

  A. Queen Victoria                        B. George V.

  C. Lloyd George                         D. Winston Churchill

  12.The information from What Body Language Can Tell You That Words Cannot best supports which of the following statements?

  A. It is never too late to learn something new.

  B. Action speaks louder than words.

  C. Wisdom is born of experience.

  D. It is easier to preach than to practice.

  13.Through the examples given in Nonverbal Communication, the writer tries to tell us that ____.

  A. the nonverbal behavior of animals is instinctive, but it is not the case with humans

  B. animals have more elaborate nonverbal behavior than humans

  C. nonverbal communication exists in both humans and animals naturally

  D. humans might imitate each other's nonverbal behavior whereas animals' are entirely inborn

  14.The story The Girls in Their Summer Dresses deals with the subject of ____.

  A. the individual's lifestyle and outlook

  B. a person's imagination

  C. the fashion of a certain period

  D. the tradition of a society

  15.In The Constitution of the United States, ____is considered a great turning point in American history.

  A. the revolt against British rule

  B. the Constitutional Convention

  C. the establishment of legislature in each colony

  D. the aid of France through independence

  16.In Lady in the Dark, which of the following words best describes Mrs. Courtenay's behavior in the face of danger?

  A. Irritable.                            B. Scared.

  C. Calm.                              D. Watchful.

  17.According to Helen Keller in Three Days to See, which of the following statements is NOT true?

  A. Darkness would make people more appreciative of sight.

  B. Silence would teach people the joys of sound.

  C. It would be an excellent rule to live each day as if we should die tomorrow.

  D. Court records reveal every day how accurately "eyewitnesses"see.

  18.At the end of the story by Jerome K. Jerome, getting up too early had been a ____to George.

  A. routine                               B. necessity

  C. warning                              D. pleasure

  19.According to some official records, the earliest Olympic Games took place ____.

  A. in the seventh century A.D.           B. before 700 B.C.

  C. over three thousand years ago         D. a thousand years ago

  20.Which of the following novels is NOT written by Charlotte Bront? ?

  A. Pride and Prejudice                   B. The Professor

  C. Jane Eyre                            D. Shirley

  Ⅱ.READING COMPREHENSION

  In this part there are 4 reading passages followed by 20 questions or unfinished statements. For each of them there are 4 choices marked A,B,C and D. You should decide on the best answer or the best choice to complete the statement and write the corresponding letter on the ANSWER SHEET.(40 points, 2 points each)

  Passage 1

  There are two basic differences between the large and the small enterprises. In the small enterprise you operate primarily through personal contacts. In the large enterprise you have established "policies,""channels" of organization, and fairly rigid procedures. In the small enterprise you have, moreover, immediate effectiveness in a very small area. You can see the effect of your work and of your decisions right away, once you are a little above the ground floor. In the large enterprise even the man at the top is only part of a big machine. To be sure, his actions affect a   much greater area than the actions and decisions of the man in the small organization, but his effectiveness is remote, indirect, and difficult to  see at first sight. In a small and even in a middle-sized business you are normally exposed to all kinds of experiences, and expected to do a great many things without too much help or guidance. In the large organization you are normally taught one thing thoroughly. In the small one the danger is of becoming a jack-of-all-trades and master of none. In the large one it is of becoming the man who knows more and more about less and less.

  There is one other important thing to consider: do you get a deep sense of satisfaction from being a member of a well-known organization——General Motors, the Bell Telephone System, the government? Or is it more important to you to be a well-known and important figure within your own small pond? There is a basic difference between the satisfaction that comes from being a member of a large, powerful, and generally known organization, and the one that comes from being a member of a family; between impersonal grandeur and personal - often much too personal - intimacy; between life in a small office on the top floor of a skyscraper and life in a crossroads gas station.

  21.It can be inferred from the first paragraph that in a large enterprise ____.

  A. new technology is employed quickly

  B. all people work efficiently

  C. one's effectiveness is felt very slowly

  D. one can get promotion easily

  22.Generally speaking, the person working in a large enterprise ____.

  A. has to deal with a great many things

  B. knows how everything is going on around him

  C. acquires increasingly thorough knowledge within a limited field

  D. feels more secure than the one employed by a small enterprise

  23.In the second paragraph, the writer mentions "your own small pond" to refer to ____.

  A. a top leader in a larger enterprise

  B. a manager of a small enterprise

  C. a large enterprise

  D. a small enterprise

  24.According to the information provided in the passage, if you are interested in personal intimacy, you should work ____.

  A. for General Motors

  B. for the Bell Telephone System

  C. in a department in the government

  D. in a crossroads gas station

  25.The writer of this passage ____.

  A. compares the large and the small enterprises objectively

  B. obviously prefers to work for a large enterprise

  C. intends to show the advantages of working in a small business

  D. explains the disadvantages of being a top leader in a large business

  Passage 2

  In the old days, when a glimpse of stockings was looked upon as something far too shocking to distract the serious work of an office, secretaries were men.

  Then came the First World War and the male secretaries were replaced by women. A man's secretary became his personal servant, charged with remembering his wife's birthday and buying her presents; taking his suits to dry-cleaners; telling lies on the telephone to keep people he did not wish to speak to at bay; and of course, typing and filing and taking shorthand.

  Now all this may be changing again .The microchip (集成块) and high technology is sweeping the British office, taking with it much better of the routine clerical work that secretaries did.

  "Once office technology takes over generally, the status of the job will rise again because it will involve only the high-powered work-and then men will want to do it again."

  That was said by one of the executives(male) of one of the biggest secretarial agencies in this country.What he has predicted is already under way in the U.S.

  Once high technology has made the job of secretary less routine, will there be a male takeover? Men should beware of thinking that they can walk right into better jobs. There are a lot of women secretaries who will do the job as well as they-not just because they can buy negligees(妇女长睡衣) for the boss's wife, but because they are as efficient and well-trained to cope with word processors and computers as men.

  26.Before 1914 female secretaries were rare because they ______.

  A. were less efficient than men

  B. were not as serious as men

  C. liked stockings

  D. would have disturbed other office workers

  27.Besides fulfilling other duties, a female secretary was expected to _____.

  A. be her boss's memory

  B. clean her boss's clothes

  C. do what her boss asked her to

  D. telephone her boss's wife

  28.Secrtaries,until recently, had to do a lot of work now done by _____.

  A. machines          B. other staff

  C. servants                D. wives

  29.A secretary in the future will ______.

  A. be better paid            B. have higher status

  C. have less work to do       D. have more work to do

  30.The writer believes that before long _____.

  A. both men and women will be qualified secretaries

  B. men will be better than machines

  C. men will take over women's jobs as secretaries

  D. women will operate most office machines

  Passage 3

  Clutter is the disease of American writing. We are a society strangling in unnecessary words, circular constructions, pompous frills and meaningless jargon.

  Who really knows what the average businessman is trying to say in the average business letter? What member of an insurance or medical plan can decipher the brochure that tells him what his costs and benefits are? What father or mother can put together a child's toy-on Christmas Eve or any other eve-from the instructions on the box? Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important. The airline pilot who wakes us to announce that he is presently anticipating experiencing considerable weather wouldn't dream of saying that there's a storm ahead and it may get bumpy. The sentence is too simple-there must be something wrong with it.

  But the secret of good writing is to strip every sentence to its cleanest components. Every word that serves no function, every long word that could be a short word, every adverb winch carries the same meaning that is already in the verb, every passive construction that leaves the reader unsure of who is doing what-these are the thousand and one adulterants (赘词)that weaken the strength of a sentence. And they usually occur, ironically, in proportion to education and rank.

  During the late 1960's the president of Princeton University wrote a letter to mollify the alumni after a spell of campus unrest. "You are probably aware,"he began,"that we have been experiencing very considerable potentially explosive expressions of dissatisfaction on issues only partially related."He meant that the students had been hassling them about different things. As an alumnus I was far more upset by the president's syntax than by the students' potentially explosive expression of dissatisfaction. I would have preferred the presidential approach taken by Franklin D. Roosevelt when he tried to convert into English his own government's memos, such as this blackout order of 1942:

  Such preparations shall be made as will completely obscure all Federal buildings and non-Federal buildings occupied by the Federal government during an air raid for any period of time from visibility by reasons of internal or external illumination.

  "Tell them,"Roosevelt said,"that in buildings where they have to keep the work going to put something across the windows."

  31.What is the author's main purpose in writing the passage?

  A. To show the intellectual level of most Americans.

  B. To criticize wordy writing.

  C. To inform readers of the American writing style.

  D. To describe the best way of communication.

  32.The reason why the author quotes Roosevelt is to ____.

  A. provide evidence for the government document

  B. reveal the hidden power of words

  C. give an example of the authority's role during the crisis

  D. show how simply the blackout order could have been stated

  33.According to the passage, the airline pilot avoids using the word"storm"because the word____.

  A. may frighten the passengers

  B. is ambiguous

  C. is too ordinary.

  D. sounds important

  34.The author gives the example of the president of Princeton in order to show that____.

  A. educated people usually communicate clearly

  B. educated people tend to act like leaders

  C. simplicity is something easily forgotten by leaders or educated people

  D. simplicity is not suitable for the style of leaders or educated people

  35.Which of the following words is NOT negatively slanted?

  A. Clutter                              B. Jargon

  C. Decipher                            D. Brochure

  Passage 4

  When I first considered becoming a college professor, tenure was not an attraction or even an issue. I was drawn to the profession by the work and the environment. Even after earning a Ph.D., spending time working in Washington D.C., and finally getting my first teaching job in public administration, I was not particularly concerned with tenure. I now work at a regional institution that requires an attainable balance between teaching, research, and service. I have always been a hard worker and see no reason to stop.

  But my vision of tenure has changed, I do not want to always by the same kind of professor I am now. Now, I am working on articles, course preparations, learning the details of the curriculum so I can advise students, and building institutional knowledge by serving on university committees. Today, my productivity is high and I focus on "collecting beans," tomorrow, I would like to focus on quality.

  Whether tenure can give me the opportunity to focus on quality is questionable, but the idea of longevity is a concept that seems to have broad acceptance in most professions. My friends who became lawyers and accountants spend their time talking about becoming partners; medical doctors talk about establishing a practice; civil servants are protected by the merit system. The professionals in these fields serve a probationary period(试用期) and demonstrate competence to attain a certain level of freedom in their fields. After that, we expect that their professionalism can be used to serve society.

  Are college professors and universities different from lawyers, law firms, and the American Bar Association or doctors, practices, and the American Medical Association? The answer is both yes and no. Rarely does one hear about a professor being brought to court for malpractice. Still, the college professors I know work long hours, serve arduous, poorly-paid probationary periods, are dedicated to their students and their fields and do not want to work in another profession after they have arrived in this one. Thus tenure is often seen as the reward for years of struggle. Tenure, therefore, has become something important to me, specifically as a way to become firmly established in my profession.

  36.What does "tenure" probably mean in the passage?

  A. The reward to a lawyer or an accountant for his or her hard work.

  B. The right to keep one's job at a university until retirement.

  C. The chance of being promoted to a higher administrative position.

  D. The possibility of establishing one's own practice after a probationary period.

  37.By "I do not want to always be the same kind of professor I am now," the author means that ______.

  A. he is thinking of leaving his present job

  B. he does not really enjoy writing articles or preparing for courses

  C. he wants to do something more important and worthwhile

  D. he does not like the teaching environment any more

  38.In the second paragraph, "collecting beans" is nearest in meaning to ______.

  A."making significant contributions"

  B."making small achievements"

  C."enjoying the rewards of hard work"

  D."gaining greater professional competence"

  39.Which of the following is NOT true according to the passage?

  A. The writer is not sure that tenure would let him focus on quality.

  B. Young lawyers look forward to sharing the ownership of the firm they work for.

  C. College professors have small salaries until their probationary period is over.

  D. College professors may consider working in some other professions if they are not properly rewarded.

  40.The writer mentions lawyers and accountants in order to ______.

  A. explain why he chose teaching as his career

  B. illustrate how other professionals view their work

  C. prove that professors and other professionals have the same idea about quality

  D. show that college professors' expectation of job security is reasonable

  Ⅲ.SKIMMING AND SCANNING

  In this part there are 3 reading passages followed by 10 questions or unfinished statements. For each of them there are 4 choices marked A,B,C and D. Skim or scan the passages, then decide on the best answer and write the corresponding letter on the ANSWER SHEET.(10 points, 1 point each)

  Passage 1

  Nurse Kettle took the river path. Dusk had fallen over the valley and as she descended into it her own footfall sounded unnaturally loud on the firm turf. Thump, Thump, Thump,  she went, down the hillside. Were those only her footsteps? She stopped dead, tilted her head and listened. Only occasional rural sounds disturbed the quiet of nightfall. She could actually hear the cool voice of the stream.

  She did not cross Harper's Bridge but followed a rough path along the right bank of the river, past a group of alders and another of willows, this second group, extending in a sickle-shaped mass from the water's edge into Harper's Meadow, rose up in the dusk. She could smell willow leaves and wet soil. As sometimes happens when we are solitary, she had the sensation of being observed but she was not a fanciful woman and soon dismissed the feeling.

  "It's turned much cooler," she thought.

  A cry of mourning, intolerably loud, rose from beyond the willows and hung on the night air. A brown bird whirred out of the thicket close to her face and the cry broke and moved again gently in several different directions. It was the howl of a dog. She pushed through the thicket into a clearing by the river and found the body of Colonel Carter with his dog Skip bedside him, mourning him.

  41.Why did Nurse Kettle suddenly stop?

  A. She thought she was dying.

  B. She wondered if she was alone.

  C. She wanted to hear the sound of the stream.

  D. She thought she heard a voice.

  42.Which direction did Nurse Kettle take when she reached Harper's Bridge?

  A. She crossed it and continued along the right bank.

  B. She didn't cross it and turned away from the trees.

  C. She followed a path through some tress.

  D. She followed a path by the river bank.

  43.What caused Nurse Kettle to feel that she was being watched?

  A. The strange shape in the mist.

  B. The damp smell of the wet earth.

  C. A sense of not being alone.

  D. A drop in the temperature.

  44.Where did Nurse Kettle discover the body of Colonel Carter?

  A. In some thick bushes.

  B. In the river with his dog.

  C. Among the willow trees.

  D. In an opening beyond the bushes.

  Passage 2

  The idea of "a chain of stores," buying directly from the manufacturer in large quantities and selling in many different places throughout the country, had its beginning with Woolworth, Kress,        Kresge, and others who followed them. They were the forerunners of the large retail chain and department stores. These men had the vision to see that the more the manufacturers produced, the greater would be the saving to the consumer.

  Frank Woolworth was born in the town of Rodman in New York State, in the year 1855. He had a poverty-stricken childhood, which meant hardly enough to eat, one pair of boots a year, and never a warm coat for the winter. Frank did not like farming. He dreamed of being a railroad engineer. Later, he changed his ambition and wanted to become a merchant.

  When Frank Woolworth was a young man, apprenticeship was still in existence, particularly in the eastern part of the United States. A boy was taken into a business to learn a trade, or to learn how to conduct the business. He was considered to be worth very little to the owner during his learning period. Sometimes, the apprentice would be given his board and a room. The businessman felt that he was doing something worthwhile for the young man he took as an apprentice. He reasoned that it was like sending the young man to a school and paying his tuition.

  Woolworth managed to take a short commercial course which he knew he needed to become a merchant. At first, he was given a small wage of three dollars and fifty cents a week in the firm of Moore and Smith. After a while Woolworth came to the conclusion that while he was not a good salesman, he could trim the store and dress the windows to attract customers. In time, he worked up to six dollars a week. Another merchant offered him ten dollars a week and Woolworth decided that it was enough to marry on. Unfortunately, his new employer was not interested in having his windows dressed. And after a week or two of Woolworth's poor salesmanship, he reduced his wages to eight dollars a week.

  With a wife to support now, Woolworth decided to try farming. He bought a farm on mortgage and he and his wife raised chickens. But in a short time farming bored him. Besides, Moorc and Smith asked him to return to his job. They found that they needed Woolworth as a window trimmer, to attract customers. When they offered him the job at ten dollars a week, Woolworth went back to working in the store.

  45.One thing that a store chain can do but an independent storekeeper cannot do is to ______.

  A. hold sales                       B. compete

  C. advertise                        D. buy in large quantities

  46.Frank Woolworth had ability in ______.

  A. farming                          B. salesmanship

  C. dressing store windows              D. bargaining

  47.Woolworth's first ambition was to become ______.

  A. a farmer                         B. a railroad engineer

  C. a merchant                       D. a designer

  Passage 3

  More and more residences, businesses, and even government agencies are using telephone answering machines to take messages or give information or instructions. Sometimes these machines give confusing instructions, or play messages that are difficult to understand. If you make telephone calls, you need to be ready to respond if you get a recording.

  The most common machine is the type used in residences. If you call a home where there is a telephone answering machine in operation you will hear several rings and then a recorded message that usually says something like this:"Hello. We can't come to the phone right now. If you want us to call you back, please leave your name and number after the beep." Then you will hear a "beep," which is a brief, high-pitched tone. After the beep, you can say who you are, whom you want to speak to, and what number the person should call to reach you, or you can leave a message. Some telephone answering machines record for only 20 or 30 seconds after the beep, so you must respond quickly.

  Some large businesses and government agencies are using telephone answering machines to provide information on topics about which they receive a large volume of inquires. Using these systems requires you to have a touch-tone phone(a phone with buttons rather than a rotary dial). The voice on the machine will tell you to push a certain button on your telephone if you want information on Topic A, another button for Topic B, and so on. You listen until you hear the topic you want to learn about, and then you push the appropriate button. After making your selection, you will hear a recorded message on the topic.

  48.In the passage, the writer elaborates on ______.

  A. the problems of telephone answering machines

  B. the beep of the telephone answering machines

  C. touch-tone phones

  D. how to use telephone answering machines

  49."Beep" is a brief, high-pitched tone used ______.

  A. to urge the caller to speak more quickly

  B. to urge the caller to respond quickly

  C. as a signal to remind the caller of the time left

  D. as a signal to remind the caller that he may leave a message

  50.Which of the following would be the best title of this passage?

  A. Directions of Telephone Answering Machines

  B. Advantages of Telephone Answering Machines

  C. Know-how of Telephone Answering Machines

  D. Problems of Telephone Answering Machines

  PART TWO  (30 POINTS)

  Ⅳ.WORD FORMATIONS

  Complete each of the following sentences with the proper form of the word in the brackets. Write your answers on the ANSWER SHEET.(10 points, 1 point each)

  51.(short)     The drop in the birth rate 20 years ago has created a severe ______ of workers.

  52.(strong)    Fresh evidence has greatly ______ the case against him.

  53.(grow)     The US portion of the Internet is experiencing rapid ______ in the number of networks connected to it.

  54.(courage)   I want to thank everyone who has ______ and supported me.

  55.(increase)  As resources become______ scarce, choices have to be made and priorities set.

  56.(memory)  They listen to stories, ______ nursery rhymes, read picture books and gain other experiences that prepare them to read.

  57.(fortunate) I would have been here an hour ago. but ______ I missed the train.

  58.(accept)    Smoking is no longer considered socially ______ by many people.

  59.(addition)  They appeared to be checking only if  there were any ______ persons in it.

  60.(approve)   We need parental ______ before allowing students to go on field trips.

  Ⅴ.ANSWER THE QUESTIONS

  There are 4 groups of simple questions in this part, which are based on the texts you have learned. Give a brief answer to each of the questions. Your answers must be to the point and grammatically correct. Write your answers on the ANSWER SHEET.(20 points, 5 points each)

  61.Who are the lovers in the selection from The Decameron? What are they like? What happens to them?

  (from The Decameron)

  62.What is the king's semibarbaric method of administering justice in The Lady or the Tiger? What difficulty does the princess face in the case of her lover?

  (from The Lady or the Tiger)

  63.What animals are mentioned in The Animals of Aesop? What is the moral of each of the fables?

  (from The Animals of Aesop)

  64.According to The Story of the Bible, how were Adam and Eve created? Why were they driven out of Paradise?

  (from The Story of the Bible)

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