移动课堂
您的位置:外语教育网 > 英语四六级 > 试题中心 > 四级试题中心 > 正文

大学英语四级模拟试题(10)

2006-06-03 12:07   我要纠错 | 打印 | 收藏 | | |
Part II Reading Comprehension (35 minutes)
Directions:There are four reading passages in this part. Each passage is followed by some questions. For each question there are four suggested answers marked A,B,C and D. You should choose the One best answer and blacken the corresponding letter on the ANSWER SHEET with a pencil.
Passage 1
By the time the Olympics begin in Atlanta this summer, the business world will have spent more than $ 1 billion to link their names and products to the Olympic Games. There are 10 Worldwide Sponsors, 10 Centennial Olympic Partners, about 20 regular sponsors and more than a hundred licensees. The Atlanta Games will boast an “official" scouring pad and timepiece, two official game shows, and three official vehicles: a family car, an import minivan and a luxury sedan.
But what exactly do these companies reap for their huge investment? At the very least, they command tickets to the most popular events, invitations to the best parties and prime hotel rooms. But most of all, according to US Postal Service, it is purchasing the right to spend money.
And the right to spend money is expensive. The biggest backers, Olympic sponsors like Anheuser-Busch, Coca-Cola, Mcdonald's and Xerox, commit up to $ 40 million. But, getting the rights to the Olympic rings is only half the battle. The other half is the challenge to sort of wrap their product brands around that image. Often that means TV time. And at roughly $ 400 000 per 30-second spot, some of the biggest sponsors have already locked up every commercial slot in their product categories that NBC has to sell. Not everyone is convinced that the Games are worth the price of business admission. The biggest and most conspicuous naysayer is Nike. Its spokesman says:“If I see a Reebok official who may not be in the best shape firing the starting pistol and Carl Lewis wearing Nike shoes, I'm going to go with Carl because that's the authentic link." Nike's strategy is hard to argue with - instead of sponsoring the Olympics, it sponsors Olympians.
Yet even Nike wants a piece of the Atlantic action. Along with some other nonsponsors, Nike is trying to dot downtown Atlanta with billboards. Advertisement, it's another Olympic event.
1. By “official vehicles", the author means .
A. automobiles for Olympic officials
B. automobiles used in official occasion
C. automobiles that the Olympic participants must drive
D. automobiles that allowed to bear the Olympic symbol
2. Which of the following is not an Olympic sponsor?
A. US Postal Service.
B. Nike.
C. Coca-Cola.
D. Mcdonald's
3. The last sentence of this passage indicates .
A. businesses trying to get publicity is a part of the Olympic Games
B. what the Olympic non-sponsors do is of no interest to the Olympic organizers
C. that businesses must try very hard to earn money from the Olympic Games as if they were themselves competing in the Games
D. that those who fail to sponsor the Olympics this time will try very hard the next time 4. Which of the following is NOT implied in the passage ?
A. Companies use their Olympic sponsorship to promote sales of their products.
B. To provide sportswear for Carl Lewis is a more effective advertisement than to provide suits for Olympic officials.
C. NBC makes great profits from selling advertising time to companies eager to impress potential customers during the Olympic Games.
D. Nike looks down upon the Olympic Games.
5. Which of the following can best sum up the passage?
A. Businesses want to profit from the Olympics.
B. The 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games.
C. The Olympic sponsorship.
D. Importance of the Olympic Games.
Passage 2
Halloween(October 31)
This is a holiday widely celebrated with different names in many countries. Although it originated as a religious holiday, it has lost its religious connections in the United States. It is now celebrated largely as a children's day, and many American children look forward to it for days and weeks beforehand.
The orange pumpkin is harvested at this time of year and is hollowed out, a funny face cut into it, and a candle placed inside as a decoration in the window. City folks, nowadays, sometimes use paper pumpkins for decorations.
Some years ago, the holiday was celebrated by dressing up in strange and frightening costumes and playing tricks on one's neighbors and friends, such as ringing door bells, throwing bits of corn on the window panes, and in other ways making minor disturbances.
More recently, children come to the door to have friends and neighbors admire their costumes and guess who they are behind the false faces and receive treats of candy, fruit or cookies. They say, “Trick or Treat", meaning, “I will play a trick on you will not give me a treat." This practice has even more recently developed into a significant international activity. Instead of or along with candy, the children collect money for UNICEF (United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund). This special collection of money by children for needy children throughout the world is known as “UNICEF Trick of Treat". Begun only recently, it results in several million dollars each year contributed to UNICEF. The collection box is orange, reminiscent of the pumpkin.
6. What cloes Holloween originate from?
A. a chilolren's day
B. a trick or treat
C. a religious day
D. a day for UNI CEF
7. Which of the following is not mentioned some years ago how the children celebrate the Halloween?
A. Dressing up in strange and frightening costumes and playing tricks on one's neighbors friends.
B. Ringing door bells.
C. Throwing bits of corn on the window panes.
D. Dressing up in the best holiday clothes.
8. Which of the following is not used in the Halloween celebration?
A. Pumpkin
B. Candle
C. Costume
D. Flower
9. Why do the children collect money in the Halloween?
A. They love money.
B. They want to get enough money to buy themselves candy.
C. The adults are willing to give them money.
D. They want to help other children.
10. What is the symbol of Halloween?
A. Pumpkin.
B. Candle.
C. Laughter
D. Money.
Passage 3
International airlines have rediscovered the business travelers, the man or woman who regularly jets from country to country as part of the job. This does not necessarily mean that airlines ever abandoned their business travelers. Indeed, companies like Lufthansa and Swissair would rightly argue that they have always catered best for the executive class passengers. But many lines could be accused of concentrating too heavily in the recent past on attracting passengers by volume, often at the expense of regular travelers. Too often, they have seemed geared for quantity rather than quality. Operating a major airline in the 1980s is essentially a matter of finding the right mix of passengers. The airlines need to fill up the back end of their wide-bodied jets with low fare passengers, without forgetting that the front end should be filled with people who pay substantially more for their tickets.
It is no coincidence that the two major airline bankruptcies in 1982 were among the companies specializing in cheap flights. But low fares require consistently full aircraft to make flights economically viable, and in the recent recession the volume of traffic has not grown. Equally the large number of airlines jostling for the available passengers has created a huge excess of capacity. The net result of excess capacity and cut-throat competition driving down fares has been to push some airlines into collapse and leave many others hovering on the brink.
Against this grim background, it is no surprise that airlines are turning increasingly towards the business travelers to improve their rates of return. They have invested much time and effort to establish exactly what the executive demands for sitting apart from the tourists.
High on the list of priorities is punctuality; an executive's time is money. In-flight service is another area where the airlines are jostling for the executive's attention. The free drinks and headsets and better food are all part of the lure.
11. One criticism against many international airlines is that they have, in the recent past, .
A. catered for the more wealthy people
B. given preferential treatment to executive clients
C. only met the needs of the regular traveler
D. marketed their service with the masses in mind
12. With the intention of attracting a somewhat different type of passenger, the airlines have now begun to concentrate on .
A. ensuring that the facilities offered to the executive are indeed superior
B. providing facilities enabling business travelers to work on board
C. organizing activities in which first-class passengers can participate
D. installing sleeping compartments where more privacy is ensured
13. From the passage we can infer that .
A. a successful airline in the 1980s meets the needs not only of the masses but also of the wealthy passengers
B. it is more comfortable to sit in the back of jet planes
C. business travelers dislike tourists
D. only by specializing in cheap flights can airlines avoid bankruptcy.
14. In Paragraph 5. “in-flight service" means .
A. Service on the plane
B. A new safety device
C. Flights within one country
D. Charge-free air service
15. The following are all used to attract passengers except .
A. punctuality
B. sound system
C. free drinks
D. charge-free food
Passage 4
In only two decades Asian-American have become the fastest-growing US minority. As their children began moving up through the nation's schools, it became clear that a new class of academic achievers was emerging. Their achievements are reflected in the nation's best universities, where mathematics, science and engineering departments have taken on a decidedly Asian character. (This special liking for mathematics and science is partly explained by the fact that Asian-American students who began their education abroad arrived in the U.S. with a solid grounding in mathematics but little or no knowledge of English.) They are also influenced by the promise of a good job after college. Asians feel there will be less unfair treatment in areas like mathematics and science because they will be judged more immediate in something like engineering than with an arts degree.
Most Asian-American students owe their success to the influence of parents who are determined that their children take full advantage of what the American educational system has to offer. An effective measure of parental attention is homework. Asian parents spend more time with their children than American parents do, and it helps. Many researchers also believe there is something in Asian culture that breeds success, such as ideals that stress family values and emphasize education.
Both explanations for academic success worry Asian-Americans because of fears that they feed a typical racial image. Many can remember when Chinese, Japanese and Filipino immigrants were the victims of social isolation. Indeed, it was not until 1952 that laws were laid down giving all Asian immigrants the right to citizenship.
16. While making tremendous achievements at college, Asian-American students .
A. feel they are mistreated because of limited knowledge of English.
B. are afraid that their academic successes bear a strong Asian character
C. still worry about unfair treatment in society
D. generally feel it a shame to have to depend on their parents
17. What are the major factors that determine the success of Asian-Americans?
A. A solid foundation in basic mathematics and Asian culture.
B. Hard work and intelligence.
C. Hard help and a limited knowledge of English.
D. Asian culture and the American educational system.
18. Few Asian-American students major in human sciences mainly because .
A. their English is not good enough.
B. they are afraid they might meet with unfair judgment in these areas
C. there is a wide difference between Asian and Western cultures
D. they know little about American culture and society
19. Why do the two “explanations" (Para. 3, Line 1) worry Asian-Americans?
A. They are afraid that they would again be isolated from American society in general.
B. People would think that Asian students rely on their parents for success.
C. Asian-Americans would be a threat to other minorities.
D. American academic achievements have taken on too strong at Asian character.
20. The author's tone in this passage is .
A. sympathetic
B. doubtful
C. critical
D. objective
Part III Vocabulary and Structure (20 minutes)
Directions: There are 30 incomplete sentences in this part. For each sentence there are four choices marked A., B., C. and D.. Choose the ONE answer that best completes the sentence. Then mark the corresponding letter on the Answer Sheet with a single line through the centre.
21. When he applied for a in the office of the local newspaper, he was told to see the manager.
A. location
B. profession
C. career
D. position
22. The mere fact most people believe nuclear war would be madness does not mean that it will not occur.
A. that
B. what
C. which
D. why
23. The author of the book that women can live longer than men.
A. said
B. is saying
C. says
D. saying
24. Because of the strike, British Rail has been forced to all trains to London.
A. cancel
B. abandon
C. postpone
D. recall
25. It around 9 o'clock when I drove back home because it was already dark.
A. had to be
B. was to be
C. must have been
D. must be
26. The survival of some wild animals is not very high as they are ruthlessly hunted for their skins.
A. rate
B. degree
C. ration
D. scale
27. Why do you object to the direction?
A. following
B. follow
C. have followed
D. having been followed
28. to the doctor right away, he might have been alive today.
A. If he went
B. Had he gone
C. Were he gone
D. Should he have gone
29. is the richest man in this town?
A. Whom do you think
B. Who do you think
C. Do you think who
D. Who you think
30. A good newspaper publishes both and foreign news.
A. diplomatic
B. democratic
C. domestic
D. dramatic
31. My brother changed his major at college several times and he never any one very long.
A. stuck to
B. kept back
C. let alone
D. made way
32. It isn't cold enough for there a frost tonight, so I can leave my car outside safely.
A. would be
B. being
C. was
D. to be
33. More than one dismissed.
A. have been
B. has been
C. are
D. has
34. The first, second and the third prize went to Kate, Bob and George .
A. differently
B. partially
C. respectively
D. equally
35. The science of medicine, progress has been very rapid lately, is perhaps the most important of all the sciences.
A. in which
B. to which
C. with which
D. which
36. The frequent border incidents would lead the two countries to war.
A. consistently
B. inevitably
C. uniformly
D. persistently
37. She was scared to death when she heard the news.
A. as much as
B. as well as
C. as good as
D. as many as
38. The doctors all blamed the irresponsible boy to protect the little girl.
A. it was he that was
B. whose duty was it
C. it was whose duty
D. whose duty it was
39. What a boy he is!
A. lovely black little
B. little lovely black
C. lovely little black
D. little black lovely
40. She the newspaper and put it into the handbag.
A. did
B. wrapped
C. folded
D. clasped
41. Nylon is a special material.
A. made from
B. made of
C. made up of
D. made with
42. The text wants once more.
A. explained
B. explaining
C. being explained
D. to explain
43. Every autumn farmers the soil to destroy the weeds.
A. turn down
B. turn over
C. turn up
D. turn on
44. It is to give praise to him on such an occasion.
A. out of place
B. out of it
C. out of shape
D. out of condition
45. It was not until 1920 regular radio broadcasts began.
A. that
B. since
C. when
D. while
46. , the price would be reasonable.
A. All things are considered
B. For all things consider
C. All things considered
D. If all things considered
47. The fat man is nearly 200 pounds .
A. weighing
B. weighed
C. in weight
D. of weight
48. Harry likes eating very much but he isn't very about the food he eats.
A. special
B. unusual
C. particular
D. peculiar
49. All the people keep silent. Everyone knows the answer, ?
A. doesn't it
B. doesn't he
C. don't they
D. isn't it
50. I can't dream such a gentleman could make this immoral fault.
A. respectable
B. respectful
C. respective
D. respecting
相关资讯:
网站导航:
 学位英语 指南 动态 经验 试题 资料  托福 指南 动态 考情 留学 复习
 雅思 指南 动态 机经 经验 辅导  公共英语 指南 动态 备考 试题 辅导
 日语 指南 资讯 辅导 留学 考试  法语 发音 词汇 语法 听说 阅读
 韩语 入门 口语 阅读 留学 文化  西语 口语 词汇 阅读 留学 风采

学位英语免费试听

更多>>
  • 四级辅导
  • 六级辅导
全科套餐
280元/门
超值优惠套餐=写作+词汇+听力+阅读+翻译+真题精讲班 70课时
词汇串讲 精讲大纲词汇,轻松记忆单词
课时数:10课时
阅读串讲 紧扣大纲要求,直达阅读高分
课时数:10课时
听力串讲 剖析解题秘笈,提升听力水平
课时数:10课时
写作串讲 解读命题规律,揭秘高分技巧
课时数:10课时
翻译串讲 梳理重要考点,提高应试能力
课时数:约6课时
真题精讲 讲授历年真题,直击命题精髓
课时数:24课时

网校介绍

更多>>

外语教育网(www.for68.com)是北京东大正保科技有限公司(CDEL)旗下一家大型外语远程教育网站,正保科技成立于2005年7月,是国内超大型外语远程教育基地,上榜“北京优质教育资源榜”--“百万读者推崇的网络教育机构”。


公司凭借雄厚的师资力量、先进的网络视频多媒体课件技术、严谨细致的教学作风、灵活多样的教学方式,为学员提供完整、优化的外语课程,既打破了传统面授的诸多限制,发挥了网络教育的优势,也兼顾面授的答疑与互动特点,为我国培养了大量优秀的外语人才。


为了满足学员学习不同语种、不同阶段的学习需求,网站开设了包括考试英语、行业英语、实用口语以及小语种在内的百余门语言学习课程,涵盖英语、日语、韩语、俄语、德语、法语、西班牙语、意大利语、阿拉伯语等主要语种,供学员自由选择。此外,网站还拥有各类外语专业信息和考试信息20余万条,是广大学员了解外语类考试最新政策、动态及参加各语种培训的优质网站。


北京东大正保科技有限公司成立于2000年,是一家具备网络教育资质、经教育部批准开展远程教育的专业公司,为北京市高新技术企业、中国十大教育集团、联合国教科文组织技术与职业教育培训在中国的唯一试点项目。


公司下属13家行业远程教育网站,业务涵盖了会计、法律、医学、建设、自考、成考、考研、中小学、外语、信息技术、汉语言教学等诸多领域,拥有办公面积8000多平米,员工近千人,公司年招生规模达270万人。由于正保远程教育(China Distance Education Holdings Ltd., CDEL)在中国互联网远程教育行业内的绝对优势和强大影响力,正保教育模式一直被广大投资人所追捧。2008年7月30日,公司在美国纽约证券交易所正式挂牌上市(股票交易代码:DL),是2008年唯一一家在美国纽交所上市的专业从事互联网远程教育的中国企业。


精彩推荐

版权声明
   1、凡本网注明 “来源:外语教育网”的所有作品,版权均属外语教育网所有,未经本网授权不得转载、链接、转贴或以其他方式使用;已经本网授权的,应在授权范围内使用,且必须注明“来源:外语教育网”。违反上述声明者,本网将追究其法律责任。
  2、本网部分资料为网上搜集转载,均尽力标明作者和出处。对于本网刊载作品涉及版权等问题的,请作者与本网站联系,本网站核实确认后会尽快予以处理。
  本网转载之作品,并不意味着认同该作品的观点或真实性。如其他媒体、网站或个人转载使用,请与著作权人联系,并自负法律责任。
  3、本网站欢迎积极投稿
  4、联系方式:
编辑信箱:for68@chinaacc.com
电话:010-82319999-2371