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2006-07-28 19:21

  I have thus a tight shingled and plastered house, ten feet wide by fifteen long, and eight-feet posts, with a garret and a closet, a large window on each side, two trap doors, one door at the end, and a brick fireplace opposite.  The exact cost of my house, paying the usual price for such materials as I used, but not counting the work,all of which was done by myself, was as follows; and I give the details because very few are able to tell exactly what their houses cost, and fewer still, if any, the separate cost of the various materials which compose them:——

  Boards …… $ 8.03+, mostly shanty boards. Refuse shingles for roof sides ……  4.00 Laths ……  1.25 Two second-hand windows with glass ……  2.43 One thousand old brick ……  4.00 Two casks of lime ……  2.40  That was high. Hair ……  0.31  More than I needed. Mantle-tree iron ……  0.15 Nails ……  3.90 Hinges and screws ……  0.14 Latch ……  0.10 Chalk ……  0.01 Transportation ……  1.40  I carried a good part

                                      ------- on my back.

  In all …… $28.12+

  These are all the materials, excepting the timber, stones, and sand, which I claimed by squatter's right.  I have also a small woodshed adjoining, made chiefly of the stuff which was left after building the house.

  I intend to build me a house which will surpass any on the main street in Concord in grandeur and luxury, as soon as it pleases me as much and will cost me no more than my present one.

  I thus found that the student who wishes for a shelter can obtain one for a lifetime at an expense not greater than the rent which he now pays annually.  If I seem to boast more than is becoming, my excuse is that I brag for humanity rather than for myself; and my shortcomings and inconsistencies do not affect the truth of my statement.  Notwithstanding much cant and hypocrisy ——chaff which I find it difficult to separate from my wheat, but for which I am as sorry as any man —— I will breathe freely and stretch myself in this respect, it is such a relief to both the moral and physical system; and I am resolved that I will not through humility become the devil's attorney.  I will endeavor to speak a good word for the truth.  At Cambridge College the mere rent of a student's room, which is only a little larger than my own, is thirty dollars each year, though the corporation had the advantage of building thirty-two side by side and under one roof, and the occupant suffers the inconvenience of many and noisy neighbors, and perhaps a residence in the fourth story.  I cannot but think that if we had more true wisdom in these respects, not only less education would be needed, because, forsooth, more would already have been acquired,but the pecuniary expense of getting an education would in a great measure vanish.  Those conveniences which the student requires at Cambridge or elsewhere cost him or somebody else ten times as great a sacrifice of life as they would with proper management on both sides.  Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants.  Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.  The mode of founding a college is, commonly, to get up a subscription of dollars and cents,and then, following blindly the principles of a division of labor to its extreme —— a principle which should never be followed but with circumspection —— to call in a contractor who makes this a subject of speculation, and he employs Irishmen or other operatives actually to lay the foundations, while the students that are to be are said to be fitting themselves for it; and for these oversights successive generations have to pay.  I think that it would be better than this,for the students, or those who desire to be benefited by it, even to lay the foundation themselves.  The student who secures his coveted leisure and retirement by systematically shirking any labor necessary to man obtains but an ignoble and unprofitable leisure,defrauding himself of the experience which alone can make leisure fruitful.  "But," says one, "you do not mean that the students should go to work with their hands instead of their heads?"  I do not mean that exactly, but I mean something which he might think a good deal like that; I mean that they should not play life, or study it merely, while the community supports them at this expensive game,but earnestly live it from beginning to end.  How could youths better learn to live than by at once trying the experiment of living?  Methinks this would exercise their minds as much as mathematics.  If I wished a boy to know something about the arts and sciences, for instance, I would not pursue the common course, which is merely to send him into the neighborhood of some professor, where anything is professed and practised but the art of life; —— to survey the world through a telescope or a microscope, and never with his natural eye; to study chemistry, and not learn how his bread is made, or mechanics, and not learn how it is earned; to discover new satellites to Neptune, and not detect the motes in his eyes, or to what vagabond he is a satellite himself; or to be devoured by the monsters that swarm all around him, while contemplating the monsters in a drop of vinegar.  Which would have advanced the most at the end of a month —— the boy who had made his own jackknife from the ore which he had dug and smelted, reading as much as would be necessary for this —— or the boy who had attended the lectures on metallurgy at the Institute in the meanwhile, and had received a Rodgers' penknife from his father?  Which would be most likely to cut his fingers?……  To my astonishment I was informed on leaving college that I had studied navigation! —— why, if I had taken one turn down the harbor I should have known more about it.  Even the poor student studies and is taught only political economy, while that economy of living which is synonymous with philosophy is not even sincerely professed in our colleges.  The consequence is, that while he is reading Adam Smith, Ricardo, and Say, he runs his father in debt irretrievably.







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